Money Market Funds

A money market fund is an open ended mutual fund that that invest in short term debt security. They invest in commercial paper and US treasury bills. Money market funds are as safe as bank deposits and give you a higher yield. They are regulated in the United states with the Investment company act of 1940. Money market funds are unique from different funds because they are made to keep a constant price of 1:00 per share all the time. They only pay interest and never give you capital gains or dividends. One of the most common types of money market funds is one that holds short term securities and can hold treasury bills, commercial paper, bankers’ acceptances, short term CDs, and others. it matures in 120 days or less.

People who want can take the risk of obtaining higher yield for their investors should get a money market fund. They are generally safe to invest in because it is government insured. Investors who keep these funds may risk missing out on profitable rates of return else where.

Bruce Bent II is a finicial expert and businessman who has indepth knowledge of money market funds. So much so, because in 1970 an his father was the founder of the first money market fund. Bruce Bent II learned a lot from his father and later started his own career in the financial sector. Bent II graduated with a Bachelor’s in Philosophy from Northeastern. Soon after, he was on his way to being a respected and sought after financial expert. Bruce Bent II added some rules and discipline to the world of money markets. The impact would create an industry that is now over $3.0 trillion and who serves millions of investors.
Brent Bruce II currently works with Double Rock Corporation as the acting president and vice chairman of the board. He has used innovated techniques and stratedgies to help various financial institutions including banks, retail marketers and broker-dealers.

For more information follow Bruce Bent II on Twitter.

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